What Drives You to Build A Better Lifestyle?

  • May 28, 2009 by Corbett Barr
  • 3 Comments

solo-boat-journey

You’re probably reading this blog because you are focused on designing your ideal lifestyle. What drives you to create an extraordinary lifestyle?

Was there a specific moment or an event or some other catalyst that made you realize the path you were on wasn’t where you wanted to be?

There are some people lucky enough to have known from the start the direction they wanted their lives to take. However, many of us started on entirely different paths before we wondered why we had to fit into society’s idea of a successful life.


For me, there was a series of events that led me away from corporate life and ultimately to focus on lifestyle design and location independence. I started my working life (like many Americans) focused on money as a key to happiness.

At some point I saw that most people who made a lot of money weren’t happy because their career had taken over their lives. It became clear that succeeding under other people’s terms required that I put my life on hold for the benefit of the companies I worked for.

I wanted to live my life fully now instead of waiting to live it in retirement. That set me on a quest to make the lifestyle I wanted possible. It led me to become self employed, move abroad and start this blog.

What caused you to focus on creating your ideal lifestyle? What’s important to you now? How did you get here?

Share your story in the comments, and please subscribe to free updates from Free Pursuits to keep the conversation going.

photo by Today is a good day

Written by . Corbett is cofounder of Fizzle, a place for creative entrepreneurs, writers, makers, coders and artists, all working to support themselves doing what they love independently on the Internet. Follow Corbett on on Twitter.


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Autom May 28, 2009 at 8:06 am

An interesting point/question, likely not often reflected upon by many, as the general tendency would be to continually get ahead, improve and secure long term contentness. Yet there’s the rub: contentness, along with one’s own sense of what is an ‘ideal lifestyle’ is typically dependent on personal (and usually emotionally-drive) experience. In my case, I have managed to reconcile the need to live modestly within my means while also pursuing my non-career passions, which include anything creative/artistic, adventurous or physcially active. The even harsher reality is that yes, some of these pursuits do need money. But what I consider to be of most value and what brings most enrichment to my lifestyle is being able to infuse creativity in the dull, monotone elements of the have-to-do’s in my day-to-day.

Thanks for sharing this post Corbett. Autom

Corbett Barr May 28, 2009 at 3:19 pm

Thanks Autom. I like your approach of making the day-to-day more creative. It sounds like you focus most on enjoying your non-career passions. I’m sure a lot of people fit in that category.

Emnet June 3, 2011 at 7:41 am

Well, I’m not a very creative person, but I am driven towards a professional career that I have always pursued and continue to do so. However, sometimes I wonder if I will be happy at the end of it all. My motto has always been to work on things that I can, to improve what’s in my control.

Besides my love for my career plan, and the path that takes me there, I push through everyday because I want a safe destination. In a few years I want to be able to know that most of the hard part is over and I can enjoy the simple pleasure life has to offer.

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